How I Use 1L Mastery to Survive the Day-to-Day

Mara Masters, 1L at Emory Law

Hi! My name is Mara and now that Stephanie has graduated to the 2L life, I am taking over here at the 1L Life.

If you’re reading this, that probably means you are either my mom (Hi mom!) or that you have made it through the first few weeks of Law School! Congratulations! Ignore the nagging feeling that you understand less about the law than when you started and remind yourself of everything you’ve accomplished. Now remind yourself again. Law school is hard, but you can crush it.

If you still feel weighed down by how little you understand about the law, don’t worry. I get it. That’s one of the reasons I love the BARBRI 1L Mastery Package. Another reason is that just like every other student at Emory Law, immediately after I was sworn into the profession, I also swore undying loyalty to Professor Freer. I have no problems with this, because I am the weirdo who actually loves Civ Pro.

1L Mastery Package is for the start of the semester just as much as for the end.

Jokes aside though, here are some ways I use it in my day-to-day work:

  • To illuminate the overarching concepts that I can’t piece together from the case readings.

I am a global thinker to a fault.

You know the adage, “don’t lose sight of the forest for the trees?” My problem is more like I am standing in a forest and can’t tell that what is in front of me is a tree because I don’t realize that I am in a forest.

For better or worse, we learn the law through inductive processes. That’s extra difficult when you are learning dense material that often seems to defy logic. I often find myself standing right in front of Promissory Estoppel and can’t tell that I am in Contracts. When this happens, I open up my 1L Outlines Book, and instantaneously have the immediate context for every concept. This helps me understand complex topics immensely more than re-reading cases does.

1L Notes
(Photo of study notes: My actual, hand-written notes on Consideration. Not pictured: the vat of coffee just outside the frame)

It also helps me refresh previous concepts. Can’t remember how personal jurisdiction works? No worries. I can go watch that lecture from Professor Freer on the BARBRI website and then take a follow-up quiz to make sure I understand it. (Side note: at Emory, we refer to Professor Freer’s lectures as “The Freer Tapes” as though they are top-secret FBI documents).

  • To define terms succinctly.

Do you remember when you were in elementary school and had to practice using context clues to define unfamiliar words? I often feel like that when reading casebooks. Legal jargon is dense, ya’ll. Sometimes using context clues doesn’t work and looking up terms online is more confusing than just going about my life in ignorance.

Dog reading
(Photo of Charley- I swear I did not bribe him with treats to wear those glasses in front of a BARBRI outline book. I found him like this. Swear.)

And sometimes I go online to look something up and come back to my textbook 40 minutes later with a new pair of boots from L.L.Bean and zero terms defined. That is neither here nor there. The point is that the 1L Outlines Book does a pretty excellent job at defining complex words simply enough that my elementary-school brain can handle it.

  • I’m thinking toward the endgame.

Good 1L Outlines are beefy.

I have held some in my hands that weigh literal pounds. They are intimidating – “A problem for future-Mara,” as I sometimes say. But by exposing myself regularly to very well constructed outlines, I am “photographing two birds with one exposure” (thank you Professor George Shepherd) – I am learning the material I need to learn and teaching myself the language of the outline at the same time!

  • Charley Likes It.

If you’re still not sure about whether 1L Mastery might be helpful to you, give it a try. It’s free for a limited time. Have any questions about how I use it or why I love Civ Pro? Reach out! You can find me on Instagram and Twitter at @the1Llife!

Paying it Forward 2L Style

2L

GUEST BLOG Stephanie Baldwin, 2L at the University of Arizona

Paying it Forward 2L Style

We’ve all been there… and now it is time to pay it back, by paying it forward by helping 1Ls. Often, I talk to my fellow 2Ls to find out what I should write about each week. My friend Katrina suggested this topic and also provided a meaningful quote that is the inspiration for this week’s blog. She said, “As a 1L I thought any advice or words of affirmation from 2Ls felt like a life raft. It is our duty to pay it forward.” She is so right!

I have already taken a few 1Ls “under my wing” by giving advice, and even going as far as getting some second-semester books off our free bookshelf for them. YES!  UofA has a free bookshelf in the library that often has textbooks on it! There are a lot of ways you can pay it forward by helping 1Ls. You might already be doing this through your club, as a BARBRI rep (pssst…. check out the 1L Mastery package), or in some other way. I know I talk a lot about networking and forming relationships with class members, but recently I met with an attorney and they urged me to not only form relationships within my class but at a minimum with the class above and below me as well. For now, let’s just focus on the 1Ls.

Join the Mentor Program

Ok, this may seem obvious, but be on the lookout to see if your school has a formal mentoring program, if they do, sign up. But, if you don’t feel like you have the time to dedicate to the program, be a mentor in other ways. For instance…

2L – Just say hi!

At lunch, make the 1Ls feel welcome. You will likely see a few at the lunch events and if it is on a special topic, you might share similar interests. This is the perfect time to strike up a conversation.

Share your Wisdom

Think about how it felt last year, not really knowing anything about the classes or professors. Now, we’ve been there and done that. You are a wealth of information! For example, you could give:

  1. Advice on Professors
    Share tips on preparing for class, surviving cold calls, or exam tips.
  2. Share Your Outlines
    Have a great outline, or know a resource that can help a 1L out? Let them know and share!
  3. Recommend Clubs
    Help a 1L navigate the plethora of student organizations and clubs. You know who has the best lunch offerings, which clubs have the best events, and provide the best support.
  4. Give tips on having a life outside of law school
    Law school often seems life-consuming, but one of the tips I heard over and over again was to find something else to do as well. Sarah, a fellow 2L, recommended to “Get a hobby that isn’t law school-related. I did Yoga that helped me have friends outside of law school and that was so important!” Share your secrets…

Also, Share Your Struggles

No matter where you are ranked, we all shared struggles during our 1L. It could have been school-related, like the fear of the first cold call, or the impact of living in a new city. I remember seeing 2Ls and it seemed like they may have breezed through 1L, so it was great to hear about their struggles. It made me realize what I was going through was not unique, and that I was going to be ok!

Let me know how you’re paying it forward on Twitter or Instagram @The2LLife. I would love to hear from you!

The2Llife: Reflecting on 1L Summer

GUEST BLOG by Dani Gies,
Attorney Advisor at Los Angeles Immigration Court
(written as a Rising 2L entering the start of the fall semester, exclusively for BARBRI)

It’s time to take stock of what happened during the summer.

I worked for the Executive Office for Immigration Review (a component of the Department of Justice) in Immigration Court. The Court was attached to a detention facility, so all of the respondents in court were detained. I served as sort of the clerk to the clerk, since there was only one law clerk for the four Immigration Judges. Since there were only two of us, I got tremendous legal research and writing experience, and also learned substantive criminal immigration law along the way. I also made really meaningful personal connections. All in all, I had the best 1L summer job experience I could have hoped for.

Did you have a great summer, too? Tips to keep floating on Cloud Nine:

  • Thank your supervisor and those who made your experience possible. An email is nice for a coworker with whom you worked a couple of times, but I recommend a handwritten card for your supervisor. After all, taking on an intern is a lot of extra work for an organization and for the person supervising you. Furthermore, let them know that you really enjoyed yourself.
  • Keep in touch and follow up. If someone in the office offered their help to you in the form of a letter of recommendation, reference or just making a connection, be sure to follow up. While you are back in school living the good life, they’re still on the work grind and may already have another intern. Send an email to confirm their willingness to be a reference or remind them of the connection you were hoping to make.
  • Be introspective. Did you expect to like your work? If so, was it the content of the work or the type of work? Did you enjoy an aspect of the work you didn’t expect? How does this inform the types of work opportunities you will look for in the future?

Was your summer not as great as you had hoped? Consider this:

  • Thank your supervisor and those who made your experience possible. An email is nice for a coworker with whom you worked a couple of times, but I recommend a handwritten card for your supervisor. Even if it was not the best experience for you, taking on an intern is a lot of extra work for an organization and for the person supervising you. Furthermore, just because you left with a bad taste in your mouth does not mean you should leave the organization with one in theirs.
  • Keep in touch and follow up. If someone in the office offered their help to you in the form of a letter of recommendation, reference or just making a connection, be sure to follow up. Although the organization you worked for may not be the best fit, if you are candid with someone there, they may be able to refer you for a job better suited to you. Send an email to remind them of the connection you were hoping to make.
  • Be introspective. Did you expect to like your work? If so, what made you dislike your experience? Was it the content of the work, the type of work, the environment, the people? Did you enjoy any aspects of the work? How does this inform the types of work opportunities you will look for in the future?

If you didn’t cheat and read both sections, you’ll notice I gave the same advice, although worded slightly differently. This is because I firmly believe that it is just as important to learn what you don’t like as to learn what you do like.

You’re not married to your 1L summer job or your 2L summer job or the first job you get after graduating. Thus, every experience gives you more information about what work makes you happy and what gets you down in the dumps, leading you ever closer to the job that is right for you. I hope you’re able to view your summer experience in this light.

Reflecting on the 1L life

GUEST BLOG Stephanie Baldwin, 1L at the University of Arizona

It’s hard to believe that I take my last final tomorrow and by the time you read this I will be done with my 1L, and likely so will you!

In addition to the thousands of pages I read, the notes I’ve taken, and papers written, I have learned so much more this past year than just about the law, but about myself and the way, I view the world. So, while this may be a tad cliché, here are the biggest takeaways from my life as a 1L.

I made the right choice.

It took forever for me to decide which school I was going to go to. I was caught up in rankings, prestige, and conflicted about where I wanted to practice. In May I still had multiple seat deposits down, and it wasn’t until I decided that I wanted to stay in Arizona to practice that my choice became clear.  Even though I was closer to a different law school, U of A made the most sense and I was pretty confident I would fit in well there. I am so grateful that I came to this school. It is 100% where I needed to be.

So 0Ls, if you’re stressing, worried about rankings my best advice is to visit schools, sit in on classes and talk to judges and lawyers in the area you want to practice. Their advice is what helped me decide to stay in Arizona and chose my school. If you’re in a similar position or just starting the process, get out there and speak to people in your legal community.

Friends Make Law School 1000 times better…

I honestly don’t know what I would have done this year without my group of friends at school. School is stressful, and sometimes, you can’t avoid outside life spilling over, and my friends have been there through excessive laughter and tears. I can’t thank them enough. Throughout the year I’ve become closer with different groups, ranging from my micro group, the “Fantastic 4”,  to my small section, “the couch crew,” and with others in classes this semester. Special shout out Kevhilanie and to my fellow Watchers of the Law… yep, we have a group that meets to watch the final season of GoT. Yep, I have turned into that person who uses nicknames for friend groups. This is what law school does to you.

I understand that some people approach law school like a lone wolf, and I get it. Law school is as competitive, and you can make it even more competitive if you want to. But law school is also a community. Not only are my classmates my friends, but they are also going to be my colleagues, and just like we support each other now, I am confident we will continue to do that throughout our careers.  At our orientation a Professor said, “Make friends, not enemies” and that advice guided me the entire year and will continue to guide me into my legal career.

I have embraced “It depends”…

Before starting school, I had always prided myself on being able to see “both sides” on most issues, or so I thought. Law school taught me that I was more closed minded than I realized. This has been perhaps the most significant way law school has changed me. I listen better. Through cases, class discussions, and lunchtime events, I have been exposed to more viewpoints than ever. Instead of being closed minded and holding my ground on issues I held dear, law school has taught me to be an even better listener, to see the other side of an issue and try to understand it through discussion. Sure, some of my core ideas haven’t changed, but I feel much more understanding of the views of others and why they have them. So now when someone asks my opinion on something, I realize… it depends.

It’s been great sharing the @The1LLife with you, and I look forward to seeing you all @The2LLife next Fall!

You Never Forget Your First Oral Argument…

GUEST BLOG Stephanie Baldwin, 1L at the University of Arizona, James E. Rogers College of Law


First, we had research projects, then memos, and finally we’ve reached the oral argument stage of our law school careers. For most, this is a stressful time, especially for those who do not like to speak in front of others. Even if you have a lot of public speaking experience, it is not uncommon to be nervous, but our professor has reassured us that the nerves can actually be helpful. Here are some tips I’ve learned as I prepare for my first graded oral argument.

Handle the Nerves

A 2L told me if I wasn’t nervous before my oral argument “I wasn’t doing it right.” It was also reassuring to have our professor share that even experienced attorneys, with decades of experience, still get nervous before an oral argument. The “good part” of nerves is that they keep us on our toes. The “bad part” is, if not managed, they may impact our performance. Great…

The best advice I can give is to find a coping mechanism for your nerves. Some people like to visualize their performance, and others wear a favorite clothing item or hold something in their hand. For me, it’s applying pressure to my pinky finger. I know it sounds weird, but I acted as a kid, and this was a trick an experienced actor showed me. It’s easy to conceal, and I can’t even explain why it works, but it does. It is a small thing that helps me overcome my nerves and helps me focus.

The point is, you just need to discover what works for you. It doesn’t matter what it is, as long as it helps you to stay focused and calm. The ABA also has a great article for students here about managing your nerves.

Make A List of Questions

Make a list of questions you might be asked during your oral argument. You may have done this in class, but if you haven’t, I found it REALLY helpful! To make your own list, think of 3 questions you want to be asked, 3 questions you assume you will be asked, and 3 questions you hope you don’t get asked. You can then use these question to practice your oral argument and shore up any weaknesses you might have.

Find the Organization Method that Works for You.

There are a lot of different methods to use during your oral argument to help you stay organized, and they usually involve some type of folder system. Some recommend multiple folders, others a single folder system. In my class, we watched this video from UMKC about how to use a single folder with notecards. I liked this method, and it is what I will be using.

Practice! Present Your Argument To Someone

As the old saying goes, practice makes perfect. You can present to yourself by recording your argument and reviewing it. I also recommend practicing in front of other people. Consider working with someone familiar with all of the facts. Since they know the material, they might not pull punches and ask tough questions. The other option you have is to work with your opponent. Some people might think this is crazy and unrealistic, and it might be off limits at your schools. At mine, it is encouraged, as it will challenge the way we look at our arguments and allow us to improve our memos before we submit them.

Best of luck with your oral arguments! Let me know how they went over @The1LLife on Twitter and Instagram.

Don’t Have A Summer Job? It’s Time To Get Resourceful And Here’s How

By Chris Nikitas, Esq., BARBRI Director of Legal Education

Alright, you don’t have a summer job. It’s stressful. Whether you’re a 1L or 2L student, this is a rather scary position to be in, honestly. First thing’s first … “don’t panic.” Especially in your first year of law school. Not having a legal job during the summer isn’t an end-of-the-world scenario. I hosted bar exam trivia during my 1L summer. A prominent scholar I know taught tennis lessons. The fact is, you can make up for not having a summer job in a number of ways and here are a few ideas.

DON’T THROW IN THE TOWEL

When final exams wrap up and you still don’t have a job, do not give up. Get out there. Go to legal aid societies, public interest firms and non-profit organizations to start handing out resumes. Don’t be shy. Pass them out, whenever and to whomever you can, like they’re flyers for a local band. Even if you get an opportunity, you may be getting a late start, but you’ll still get to add a valuable line to your resume. That’s all that matters. Even if nothing comes of it, you’ll have your name circulated and show potential employers that you’re determined and driven.

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF NETWORKING EVENTS

One of the biggest benefits of a summer job is the networking opportunities; however, you can still network outside of a summer job. There will be networking events all summer for young lawyers and law students. Do some investigating, find a few to attend and start slinging around business cards like they’re candy. You’ll be surprised how quickly these networking moments (and just handing over a business card) can turn into possible employment leads in the future.

MAKE UP FOR IT DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR

Your school has opportunities to provide you with experience during the year: Field placements, internships and externships. Talk with your career services office to find out what they can offer you as far as placement help. You’ll get some course credit at the same time, too. Consider taking a litigation or drafting class for some realistic experience that you can add to your cover letter and resume.

SPEAK WITH YOUR PROFESSORS

One of your professors may still need research assistants or may introduce you to someone who would like some summer help. Your professors might even have more sage advice on how to find that elusive summer job.

Above all else, remember, this is not by any means the end of your law school career. Part of my 1L summer, I worked for career services during On Campus Interviews, serving as a runner between the interview rooms. I ate lunch with the attorneys and spoke with them more each day than anyone they interviewed. As a result, I left that week with a stack of business cards that turned into valuable new contacts. I was able to utilize them in the coming years. Just keep at it!

Spring Finals Coming In Hot: Useful Lessons Learned From Last Time

The spring semester of your first year is flying by incredibly fast. You’re at a point now when another set of final exams are on the radar, approaching rapidly. What you need to do is take the time to pick your own brain: latch onto those study habits and tips that worked best for you from the first go-round of finals back in the fall semester.

With that in mind, here are a few of the things you may have learned already on you own and other recommendations as you prep for May.

Look To Those Who Have Outlined Before You

For most law students, the process of outlining is not all that fun. Usually because most wear out their keyboards and highlighters, ending up with way too many pages. It’s hard to scale back, especially when everything seems important enough not to leave out. This typically happens when you start from scratch, so don’t. Instead, try to get your hands on a course outline from an upperclassman. (Remember, the answer is always no if you don’t ask. What have you got to lose?) It will provide guidance on what to put in your own outline. Also, it can help clear up substantive confusion and fill any gaps in the material. Remember, too, if you have access to BARBRI 1L Mastery outlines, those are a great resource of prepared outlines vetted by experienced subject matter experts.

Use Old Final Exams: The Past Is the Key To The Future

Check to see if your law school has copies of old final exams on file. If they do, use them. Sure, professors may toss a change-up any given semester on what they’ll cover or how they present questions. Yet, spending time with the old exams can help you get familiar, or even spot patterns, with their techniques. It will also test your knowledge of subjects while you are studying. Bring your practice answers to a professor or T.A. for feedback and guidance. Should your school not have old exams available, look to supplements. Many have problems in them. BARBRI 1L Mastery’s online practice questions are a convenient alternative to lugging around a book and provide answers immediately.

Start Early, Start Early, Start Early

That’s not a typo. You’ll come across this advice often. You’ll make a mental note several times throughout the year. Best intentions and all. Start studying “yesterday.” You really don’t want to cram for a final exam. The risk is too great. First year law school grades are too important. Sounds like a no-brainer; however, starting early with your finals prep is definitely easier said than done. Here’s what you can do about it: Create a study schedule or some other type of plan that works for you. Be honest with how you organize your time. Be disciplined in following through. And be sure to build in activities that aren’t spelled s-t-u-d-y … go work out, watch some t.v., hang with friends.

Keep your sanity … stay on top of studying … and you’ll Own 1L Finals!

Spring Break Destinations

GUEST BLOG Stephanie Baldwin, 1L at the University of Arizona

As we submit our memo drafts, attend OCI interviews and try to stay afloat with our extra classes, it is easy to forget that Spring Break is just around the corner. Look no further than your favorite 1L class for travel inspiration.

Pick your favorite 1L course to discover your spring break destination!

Torts

If you enjoyed torts, travel to Phoenix, Arizona for the Cactus league or Tampa, Florida for the Grapefruit league. Both destinations will keep you warm and let you work on your tan this Spring Break. Just be aware of those warnings from torts class and keep a look out for flying hot dogs and bats! If you are not a baseball fan, consider a trip to your favorite amusement park or take a cross country railroad journey. Just be prepared for falling packages!

Property

If property is your favorite class, you are going to New York. That’s right folks, one of the cases we have all read, Pierson v. Post, took place in the “wasteland” that is modernly known as the Hamptons. Treat yourself and indulge in the lavish lifestyle for the week. Alternatively, if you are looking for something a bit more adventurous, check out properties for rent in Costa Rica or Hawaii!

Constitutional Law

Philadelphia awaits! Sure, it may not be your typical Spring Break destination, but you are not the typical spring breaker. Surround yourself with history with visits to Constitutional Hall and the Liberty Bell. Run up the “Rocky” stairs, and decide if Pat’s or Geno’s wins the war when it comes to Philly cheese steaks.

Criminal Procedure or Criminal Law

Some schools teach criminal procedure as a 1L course; others have criminal law. No matter which subject you have, if this is your favorite class, your spring break destination is San Francisco! Of course, you should visit Alcatraz and experience all of the other fabulous sites this great city has to offer. Plus, you 100% deserve a trip to wine country, too.

Contract Law

Sign on the dotted line and book yourself a cruise to the Bahamas. You’ll be surrounded by contracts, at every turn and activity on a cruise, but you are well prepared for all of that fine print! When I posed this question to my professor, he mentioned the contracts related to space tourism would be fascinating, but I think that trip might have to wait until after graduation.

Civil Procedure

Good ole common law. If you’re looking for an international getaway, Hong Kong, England, New Zealand, and Australia (just to name a few) all follow common law and would be exciting spring break destinations. If you’d like to stay stateside, consider Washington D.C., visit the Supreme Court and more. As a bonus, if your spring break is in late March or early April, you will be able to experience the Cherry Blossom festival.

What other destinations pair up nicely with our 1L classes? Let me know on Twitter or Instagram @The1LLife.

3 Ways to Help Prioritize Sleep, The Secret To Higher Quality Work

GUEST BLOG Harrison Thorne,
Graduate of UCLA Law

As a 1L, I really prioritized sleep. I’d get in bed at a certain time, no matter what.

As a 2L, I did not prioritize sleep. I got distracted doing various things, and before I realized, I would only catch five to six hours, tops.

Comparing my day-to-day operations from 1L to 2L year, I can definitively say that I noticed a huge difference. Well rested, I was more alert, focused better and was much more efficient. Conversely, when I was chronically tired, the opposite was true.

My advice, looking back, is to rededicate yourself to sleeping. I did. What worked for me 1L year and what I started implementing again was simple when I followed these three steps:

Fotolia_74211266_Subscription_Monthly_MStep 1: Watching television before bed is a bad idea. Sometimes I would take in a show before bed (I’m not perfect), but when I read for pleasure before turning off the lights, I found it much easier to fall asleep.

Step 2: I enjoyed some “sleepy time” tea before bed. It really helped relax my body as well as my mind.

Step 3: I liked to do some form of meditation before turning in. I really think that is a game-changer for me and would recommend it to anyone.

These three steps were pretty consistent in helping me get to sleep faster, sleep deeper and sleep more hours.

With all this in mind, there’s one thing I’d like to point that seems extra productive initially but ultimately counterintuitive to being able to perform at your best. A lot of people in law school would talk about how to get less sleep – usually in order to get more done or have more workable hours. However, after some of my own experimentation, I learned without a doubt that it’s actually better to miss out on an extra hour or two of work, if the work you do is of a higher quality (because of the extra sleep).

3 Steps to Create a Shell Outline

GUEST BLOG Stephanie Baldwin, 1L at the University of Arizona

One of the major things I decided to implement much earlier this semester was outlining earlier and reviewing it frequently. I struggled with this last semester and by midterms I discovered what I should have done!

The answer for me was creating a “shell” outline. Though, I learned about this in my BARBRI Law Preview class, I didn’t think this was going to work for me. I was I wrong! Using this method, last year, right before midterms was so helpful. I committed to making sure that I did it this semester before I hit week 4. The followers of @The1LLife were interested in the process so here it is. How you create a shell outline in 3 pretty easy steps.

First, let me explain that a “shell outline” is an outline that combines the casebook table of contents (which are usually organized by topic and cases) and your professor’s outline. The goal of a “shell outline” is to have each case and major topic that covers from the beginning to the end of the course. Yes, I am talking about creating an outline now that will go to the end of the class.

So instead of creating an outline as you go, with a “shell outline” you fill it in as you go. The advantage of this is that everything is well organized. You don’t have to think about what to call each area, as it is already done for you. Since you are just filling in the details as you go, it makes it much easier to keep your notes organized. If you use the headings feature you can create an attack and concise outline at the same time, but we will talk about using the heading feature at a different time.

Now is the perfect time to create your shell outline and fill it in! Here is how to get started:

Step 1 – Gather the Required Materials

To do this, you will need your professors course outline and your casebook table of contents. I have most of my books in a digital format, so this is easy for me to copy and paste from. If you do not have digital versions, never fear. You simply need to go to the publisher of your textbook and look for the index, they often supply this on the student resources page. If you can’t find it there, you can just google it. For Aspen published book, you will usually find this on the companion website. Here is the master list: http://www.aspenlawschool.com/

Shell Outline

Step 2 – Merge the Documents

The next step is to merge your professors outline and the casebook table of contents together. I prefer to have the table of contents from the casebook to be the “base” of the outline. I will usually copy and paste this either from the digital casebook or from the index pdf into a google doc or word doc. Then copy and paste the headers from the professors course outline. This will provide you a document that has all of the major headers from the textbook and your professor, plus all of the cases. This will take some time, but as you go through the professor’s outline, you can delete cases you will skip and sections of the casebook you will not cover.

Step 3 – Begin Filling in the Shell Outline

Voila! The shell outline has not been created through the end of the semester! Now the final step is to start filling in your notes from the previous weeks. For cases, be sure to note the Rule, Determinative Facts and any other information your professor likes you to know. Once you have caught the outline up, you can use this shell outline to take notes the rest of the semester. 

If you follow this method, you will have an outline that has every major case, organized by topic in a way that matches the structure your professor intended. You can also organize the outline using various headings, so you can also create an attack outline as you go. 

If you have any questions about this you can reach me @The1LLife on Twitter and Instagram